Electrochemical Devices

Image of iron and water flow battery

The battery is probably the world’s most ubiquitous electrochemical device, and the most familiar. From our cars (even the standard combustion-engine kind) to our phones to a collection of other devices, batteries give us power on the move. But they’re far from the only electrochemical device the world relies on to run smoothly. In addition to building better batteries, our researchers are using electrochemistry to improve metals production, manufacture state-of-the-future microprocessors and advance green energy.

Electrochemical devices either generate electricity from a chemical reaction (like a battery) or use electrical energy to cause a chemical reaction (like a catalyst). Our researchers are making discoveries in both spheres to make advances in energy storage, manufacturing and more. They are designing batteries that can store and release intermittent forms of energy harvested from renewable sources like wind and solar. They’re lowering the cost of producing metals like titanium and aluminum—critical components for the aerospace and renewable energy industries. They’re developing more efficient catalysts for green energy systems and using electrolysis to improve production of the microprocessors that will power next-generation electronics. We collaborate with scientists from across the university through the Great Lakes Energy Institute, and our close ties with industry give our researchers the opportunity to work with corporate partners on solutions that meet the challenges of the real world.

Institutes, centers and labs related to Electrochemical Devices

Faculty who conduct research in Electrochemical Devices

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Rohan Akolkar

F. Alex Nason Chair and Ohio Eminent Scholar for Advanced Energy Research
Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering

Develops new electrochemical processes for applications including nano-material fabrication, energy storage, electrometallurgy and sensors

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Chung-Chiun Liu

Wallace R. Persons Professor of Sensor Technology & Control
Distinguished University Professor
Professor, Chemical Engineering
Director, Electronics Design Center

Develops chemical and biomedical sensors for single-use, cost-effective measurements

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Heidi Martin

Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering

Develops diamond electrodes for electrochemical and neural device applications

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Julie Renner

Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering

Works at the interface of protein engineering and electrochemistry to enable a new generation of advanced technologies

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Bob Savinell

George S. Dively Professor in Engineering
Distinguished University Professor
Professor, Chemical Engineering

Develops high-performance electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies through fundamental and applied studies of interfacial and transport processes

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Bob Savinell

George S. Dively Professor in Engineering
Distinguished University Professor
Professor, Chemical Engineering

Develops high-performance electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies through fundamental and applied studies of interfacial and transport processes

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Jesse Wainright

Research Professor, Chemical Engineering

Develops novel electrochemical systems for grid-level energy conversion and storage